Software Review: Cram (versus Anki)

Guest post by Andrew from Match Next


Last year, when our students were 4th graders, we had them start every math period studying and memorizing basic math facts. We used 2 programs to to do this: Reflex Math and Anki . Reflex Math (simple games that got kids practicing their times tables) was awesome - I rated it a 9 out of 10.  Anki (a digital flashcard program) was so-so for us, and I gave it a 7 out of 10.

We’re doing the same thing with our 5th graders this year. They spend the first 4 minutes of every afternoon math class studying a set of basic facts, then 1 minute taking a mini quiz (called a Mad Minute) to test how well they know those facts. We think there are big advantages to being able to recall facts automatically. The less they need to think about a basic math problem (like what 7x8 equals), the more they can focus on the harder aspects of tough math questions. Here’s a Dan Willingham blog I posted about this last year.

We had a problem at the beginning of this year, though: the software from last year weren’t that helpful for us. Most of our students have outgrown Reflex Math, which only covers 0-12 multiplication/division and basic addition facts. They needed a program as awesome as Reflex, but with harder math facts (like 15x10, or ½ x 80). Still haven’t found one yet. 

Anki wasn’t that good for us to begin with. Cumbersome interface and lots of active maintenance required. It’s better suited for med students studying anatomy than 5th graders memorizing basic math facts.

So, we needed to choose: Keep having kids studying flashcards on Anki, or something else. We found another flashcard software called “Cram.” 


So what is “Cram” and how do we rate it?

It’s an online flashcard program. Users create their own flashcard decks or find a set created and shared by someone else. Then they study the cards like any normal flashcard deck, without having to worry about storing/organizing actual decks of flashcards.   

I’d rate it a 8 out of 10. Our students have been using it just about every day since September, for 4 minutes a day at the start of every afternoon math class. On its own it’s not bad, but not perfect. Compared to Anki, though, it’s definitely an upgrade.  


First, Anki vs. Cram 

In a ‘head-to-head’ competition, Cram solves all the main issues we had with Anki. Here’s what those are:

 

Here’s the link to my last blog on how we used Anki last year, and why we found it tough to use.
 

How ‘Cram’ works

It’s a really easy program to use. 

1. Create a deck of flashcards and load it on the Cram website. 
2. Study the cards. 


Step 1: Creating a Deck

This is really simple. You can either create cards individually directly on the Cram website, or create a large set using a spreadsheet. We use the spreadsheet option - it’s way faster. 

You need to make a ‘front’ side and a ‘back’ side. In one column you’ll add the ‘front’ of all the cards, and add the ‘back’ of the cards in the adjacent cell. Here’s an example of a spreadsheet we used to make a set of our math facts:

 


Once you’ve got your cards ready, just upload them onto the Cram website. You copy/paste your table (like the one shown above) directly onto the website. Here’s what that section looks like: 

 


Once you’ve created the set, you can study it 


Step 2: Studying the Cards: 

a. From your dashboard, select the deck you’d like to study

 

b. Once you’re in the deck, select the specific settings you’d like to use to study your deck. Here’s a picture of the study ‘mode’ we use, plus the settings we set:

 


Here’re the settings we use:
a. ‘Memorize’: this is the study mode that allows our students to type their answers when they study a card
b. ‘Shuffle’: we want the cards to appear in random order
c. ‘Cram mode’: Cram mode is the closest thing the program has to a ‘spaced repetition’ algorithm. If a student answers a card correctly, they will not see that card again until they correctly answer the rest of the flashcards. 
d. ‘Text input’: unlike Anki, which only requires users to judge how well they think they know a flashcard, you can study cards in ‘Cram’ by manually typing in responses to questions you are studying. 


There are other ways users can study the flashcards they make, but we tried our best to keep it simple. It’s a little annoying that every time a student signs into Cram, they need to adjust those settings, but it only takes less than 10 seconds. 

Once the settings are good to go, kids study the decks. The front of the card appears, and the student types her answer into the available space. Here’s that looks like. 

 


So how do we organize the decks for the students and where is it all stored?

This is the part that was much easier for us than Anki was. In Anki, we had to upload every deck to every student’s individual account. This was a huge headache. 

In Cram, we would’ve liked a classroom dashboard directly on the program, but it doesn’t exist. Instead, we saved the website link for each deck and put them directly into a Google Spreadsheet, which is basically our ‘library’ of math flashcards. Students have this spreadsheet saved and can easily access it when they open their laptop, select the deck they need, then study it. Here’s what the flashcard library that we created looks like: 


Students know which deck they need to study. Each ‘level’ has a Mad Minute associated with it, and whenever a student gets 100% on a particular level’s Mad Minute, they ‘graduate’ to the next level. For example, if a student gets 100% on the AS Level 1 deck, she’ll move onto the AS Level 2 deck, and so on. 


The good

It’s really easy for us to manage. Like I said earlier, we only spend like 5-10 minutes a week (at most) maintaining the decks. We also love that students can type their answers to math fact questions, rather than ‘judge’ how well they think they know a math fact. This is a huge improvement over Anki. Also important for us, it’s easy for students to access with little adult assistance, and they know how to troubleshoot a lot of the problems without needing our help. Lastly, kids never run out of cards. They can always just refresh the deck, whereas in Anki, an adult needed to ‘reload’ the deck for a student. 


The bad

We’ve still had to find some good ‘hacks’ to make the program work. For example, we had to get creative to organize the decks by creating our fact card ‘library’ via Google Spreadsheets. Also, every single time a student selects a deck, she needs to change the settings to make sure the study mode is correct (e.g. typing in answers, shuffling the cards, etc.). Not a huge deal, but it get’s annoying. 

One tool I’d really like to have is the ability to see student’s progress via some sort of classroom dashboard. Right now we only have the Mad Minutes (which are still helpful), but I’d also like to get a better sense of the quality of the students’ practice time from the first 4 minutes when they’re actually using Cram.


Overall, Cram has been really solid for us. Like I said earlier in the blog though, we’d like to find  a program that’s more like Reflex Math, but with harder math facts. We love the way Reflex is gamified, and that it is able to tell us tons of information about a student’s progress towards learning a set of math facts. 


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if you'd like to talk shop: andrew.jeong@matcheducation.org

Software Review: Google Classroom

Guest post by Andrew from Match Next

Here’s a problem we haven’t really solved yet: 

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When we want to get kids reading, the easiest and best thing is: a book (sometimes on a Kindle, sometimes paper), a set of comprehension questions, and writing tasks.

The questions and writing tasks we give students are put into a packet, printed, copied, then handed out. We haven’t found anything online that’s been consistently better than what we can produce ourselves. There are a few gems here and there and some pockets of good stuff, but no materials that would provide an entire year’s worth of stuff with all the books, questions, and writing tasks packaged together in one place for us to easily use. So, we end up creating most things ourselves, picking and choosing and borrowing and tweaking everything we use in our classes. 

We’re just at the beginning of really trying to digitize all these question and writing tasks. Previously, kids were so slow at typing that it was more efficient to just have them write by hand to fill out the packets rather than type out their answers. Now, just about every kid is a faster typer than writer. So we’re experimenting with putting our literacy classwork onto Google Classroom.

So what is Google Classroom and how do we rate it?

It’s a program that helps classrooms go paperless. Teachers can use it to distribute and grade assignments, send digital resources like links to videos or websites, and make announcements by posting messages to students. 

I’d rate it a 7 out of 10. We’re just starting to assign work for kids to do digitally. So far, it’s done ~80% of what we want it to. It’s very early, though, so I may revise my opinion as we use it more. 

So what’re we doing with it?

Right now, we’re probably only using like 50% of what Google Classroom has to offer. Here’s how we use it:

  1. Create a worksheet/packet using Google Docs, and put it on Google Classroom. 
  2. “Assign it” to every student using Google Classroom. You can have the program provide each student with their own version of the worksheet/packet to work on. More details on this later. 
  3. Students work on the assignment directly on the Google Doc. We can see everything the kid does on the doc, and we never worry about losing it because it’s all stored on Google Drive. 

The other 50% of features we’re not using now may come in handy for us in the future. 

There’s a “turn in” option we haven’t really tested. Students can “submit” the assignment, and you can see what total number of assignments you’ve “collected.” There’s also a nifty grading feature, where you can use to give grades directly on Google Classroom. These go directly into a spreadsheet that collects all the data. 

What each step actually looks like

1.  Creating the worksheet/packet

You create whatever assignment you want your students to complete using Google Docs. For our trial one, we made a packet of questions for our students to answer about the fiction novel they’re currently reading, Esperanza Rising. Here’s what a section of that packet looked like:

2.  Assign it on Google Classroom

You do this on the Google Classroom page for your class. You just give it a name and due date, choose the packet you want them working on, then assign it. Here’s what the page looks like: 

3.  Students get to work

Students complete the assignment directly on Google Docs. We typed the questions in blue font, and told kids they needed to type the answers directly in empty box below the question (more on this later). Here’s an example of what a student did for one part of a packet we assigned: 


So where is everything stored?

All the documents live in the cloud. Specifically, in Google Drive. 
When you sign up for Google Classroom and create a class, the program will automatically create a folder (called “Classroom”) in your Google Drive where all your documents are stored. Here’s what that looks like:

 

Inside the “Classroom” folder, each assignment is given a folder where all your students’ responses live for that particular assignment. If you gave each student a copy of the assignment, then you’ll see one file for each student. Here’s an example of that:


You can access each kid’s file, made edits, suggestions, changes, etc. You can also change the settings so that a student can stop having editing capabilities. 


The good

If used right, no more paper. Seriously. No more having to print and make copies, no more having to hand out papers in a class, and no more worrying about losing students’ work. 

Another bonus for us has been giving students more of an opportunity to take ownership of the work. By putting everything online, including resources and other relevant documents, there’s less of a need for an adult in the room running the whole show. Like I said earlier, though, more on this in a later blog. 


The bad

One big problem with the program. When you create an assignment and allow students to edit it, they can edit every single part of the assignment. Meaning, they can even delete the questions they need to answer. Even if a kid isn’t doing this on purpose, any accidental deletions could cause serious headaches. Google needs to find a way for teachers to create a document with parts students cannot edit, and parts they can edit. 

We tried a pretty simple workaround. It’s by no means fool-proof, but it’s worked out so far okay. We just do our best to make it so clear what is a question, and what is a space for answer that question. Here’s a piece of the Esperanza Rising assignment we made for them. Questions are in bold blue letters, and they need to type their responses in the boxes only: 


We’re just starting to use this and it’s gone well so far. My guess is that we’ll get hooked and start transferring all of our classwork onto Google Classroom as possible. But I’ve thought that about tech products before, and three months in we stop using it. I’ll let you know how this one shakes out. 
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if you’d like to talk shop: andrew.jeong@matcheducation.org

Software Review: Khan Academy - Intro to JavaScript

Guest post by Andrew from Match Next


Andrew here from Match Next, our 5th grade blended learning program. We’re back from winter break and underway here - expect to hear from me weekly about all things edtech.

Today: Khan Academy’s computer programing module. During our pilot last year, when our current students were 4th graders, I blogged about 3 different programs we tested to introduce our students to computer programming basics. We tried Codecademy (didn’t like it so much), Scratch (meh), and Tynker (liked it a lot).

We’re at it again this year. Let me caveat all this by saying – I’m not on the ‘every kid needs to code because it’s a 21st century skill’ bandwagon. Frankly, I think very very few people are ever going to need to write code in their lives. Sure, there’s probably a small gain in exposing kids to it as a ‘thing’ so that if they wanted to pursue it on their own or in college it wasn’t so scarily foreign that they wouldn’t consider it. But if none of our kids graduate knowing coding, I’m not losing sleep.

However, we do have a handful of kids who we’ve been able to get through the necessary Common Core math work faster than the rest of the class. And for that crew, we were looking for a high-quality ‘extra’ that still built on some math-style logical thinking skills. We landed on coding because there are so many promising programs for it.


Enter → Khan Academy: Intro to JavaScript

 

So what is it, and and how do we rate it?

I give it an 8 out of 10. I think it’s a very well done program and a good use of time as an ‘extra’ for a kid. It does a solid job teaching different JavaScript concepts and how to use the code. There are some videos and some really neat activities where kids actually do coding, getting harder over time. The activities are challenging enough to make kids struggle, but they’re not so hard that it’s impossible for the students to complete them. Also important, it’s fun. Our kids love it, and they haven’t really gotten bored of it since starting it at the beginning of the year.

 

How it’s organized

The “Intro to JS” curriculum is organized by topic. Each set of lessons focuses on a specific aspect of designing a program. Here’s what the layout of the lessons looks like:

 

  • The left side of the page (green letters) indicates the subject students are learning about

  • The right side shows the list of videos and activities students will complete for the topic

  • When the student completes the videos or activities, the pathway will highlight green

  • If a part of the pathway is white, then the student must still complete those particular activities


Here’s how students actually use the program

Using the program is really simple for students.

  1. At the start of each topic, they’ll watch an instructional video.

  • in each video, students learn how to certain lines of codes work

  • students also learn how to actually use the code, and they observe how to write it in order to create a command

  • here’s an example of a video a student would watch. in this video, they’re learning the basics of how to draw shapes using JavaScript. 

 

     2. After they watch the video(s), they’ll practice writing the line of code they learned about.

  • In the video above, students learn how to draw shapes using lines of code. Here’s the first activity students do after watching the video, where they need to write lines of code to arrange rectangles to form the letter “H.” The code is on the left, the image they drew is on the right.

That’s the most basic version, with the tasks getting incrementally harder as they introduce new coding ‘moves.’ Kids have of a bunch of chances to gain practice, and they can also apply the concepts by writing their own programs or “creations.”

  • Here’s an example of the lines of code one of our students used to create a piece of artwork. This took Jonathan a little less than an hour, tinkering with all the variables and figuring out which adjustments made the picture turn out the way he wanted.

 

One annoying thing about the program

When students are doing activities wrong, the program isn’t very good at helping them out, or sometimes tries to be too helpful when it’s not really wanted. I’ve seen it frustrate our students a couple times because it makes them think they’re doing something wrong when they’re really not. Here’s an example (I’ve added in red below)- as students start typing lines of code, the error message pops up even though students are on the right track. The error message pops up because whatever is on the screen isn’t totally correct, so it’s prematurely telling them they’re wrong.

 

How often do our 5th graders use it?

Right now, we’ve only got about a dozen or so students learning how to code from Khan Academy. On average, they’ll spend roughly 1-2 hours per week on the program. So far, it feels like a good amount. The lessons and activities can get pretty tough, and I’ll often see kids just staring at their screens trying to think through lines of code they need to fix.

Here’s a big question for us. All of these kids spent a significant amount of time using Tynker last year, which tries to teach students how to think like programmers without actually teaching them how to write lines code. I’m not totally sure how beneficial it was to them loving Khan Academy now, but I’m sure it helped. So here’s what I’d like to figure out: should everyone first use a program like Tynker that teaches them how to “think like a programmer,” or should they jump straight into a program like Khan Academy’s “Intro to JavaScript” that starts teaching them to write lines of code right away?

 

So what’s actually happening in the room?

When students are on Khan Academy, they’re working at their own pace. If they need to watch videos, they throw on some headphones so they don’t distract other students. If they’re doing an activity, they have notebooks they use to help them map out problems. They’re working solo about 95% of the time, and I’m just in the background observing and making sure they’re on task.

Early on in the process when things got tough, students would ask for me for help and things like “it’s too hard,” or that they “can’t figure it out,” etc. From the get go, though, my reaction has just been to let kids figure it out on their own.  At first they’d get really annoyed, but now they expect it. And it’s great, because instead of waiting for me to give them the answer, the kids know they just need to sit there and figure it out. They’ll go back and redo old activities to help them, re-watch old videos, or just stare and think until they get it. I may have helped out with some good hints just once or twice the entire year out of mercy, but they never expect it.

Early on, I tried getting some students to help out the other ones as “coaches.” If a student had an especially hard time with an activity, they could ask another student to help them out. I stopped doing this almost immediately because the “coach” pretty much always gave away the answer, instead of just nudging a kid in the right direction. The student who received help would go onto later activities, but couldn’t always do them because they didn’t know things they needed to learn earlier.

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if you’d like to talk shop: andrew.jeong@matcheducation.org

TypingClub "Hacks"

Guest Post by Andrew from MatchNext

 

Our 5th graders are learning how to type. I described the software, TypingClub, in my last post.

We’ve had to figure out how to do it right. Here’re all the questions we’ve been trying to answer, and ‘hacks’ we’ve been testing out.

 

Question 1: Should kids work silently and independently, or...can they talk to each other?

Our answer: silently and independently

  1. First, we started off silently and independently, but it got a little stale.

  2. So we started letting them work in pairs where a student would ‘coach’ the kid that was typing. This was okay for a while, but was really hard to execute. Unless you had a really experienced person in the room really managing and focusing on the conversations, it wasn’t all that productive (also, the whenever a kid was ‘coach,’ they weren’t getting any or their own practice done). You don’t become a better runner by telling someone else how to run.

  3. So we settled back on ‘silent and independent.’  But I think we solved the problem of it getting stale with the ‘tests.’ More on these later.


Question 2: how do you prevent kids from becoming ‘people who have to look at their hands when they type’?

Our answer: strategically cut-up tops of copy paper boxes to cover their hands. Here’s what those look like:

    a. First, we made everybody use the boxes, all the time. Didn’t work for true beginners. They didn’t even know where the home row was, so they were constantly lifting the boxes up. Then we realized they were also not even using the home row, but we were missing it because their hands were covered. b. When this failed, we made the boxes totally optional. Another mistake. Kids got really far into the program, but they were becoming keyboard starers and couldn’t do all the levels without looking down. They’d use the boxes sometimes, but because we weren’t requiring it, they just barreled through all the levels. We had a bunch of kids get really far, but it was a false positive – they hadn’t even memorized where all the keys were. c. Boxes are still optional whenever a kid wants to practice, but now we require kids to use a box when they take a ‘test’ (more on that below). So if a kid wants to ‘pass’ a test level, they need to memorize the keys and be able to type without looking down.     So what’s a test? Answer: What we use to check and make sure kids aren’t getting too deep into the program with bad technique, or not actually memorizing the keys.   a. First (before the tests), we trusted to program to ‘assess’ their progress. We tried to monitor and catch kids as they used the wrong fingers, then we’d correct them in the moment. Once they started getting deep into the program, though, there were just too many balls in the air. More and more kids were slipping by with bad technique, and it was getting too cumbersome to manage. b. Once we realized this wasn't working, we introduced the testing. We assigned a couple levels as 'test' levels. We chose the ones that were basically review. For example, 'Level 9' was a review of the 'home row' ("A" through ";" on the keyboard). Here's what it looks like:  

 

 

a. First, we made everybody use the boxes, all the time. Didn’t work for true beginners. They didn’t even know where the home row was, so they were constantly lifting the boxes up. Then we realized they were also not even using the home row, but we were missing it because their hands were covered.

b. When this failed, we made the boxes totally optional. Another mistake. Kids got really far into the program, but they were becoming keyboard starers and couldn’t do all the levels without looking down. They’d use the boxes sometimes, but because we weren’t requiring it, they just barreled through all the levels. We had a bunch of kids get really far, but it was a false positive – they hadn’t even memorized where all the keys were.

c. Boxes are still optional whenever a kid wants to practice, but now we require kids to use a box when they take a ‘test’ (more on that below). So if a kid wants to ‘pass’ a test level, they need to memorize the keys and be able to type without looking down.  


 

So what’s a test?

Answer: What we use to check and make sure kids aren’t getting too deep into the program with bad technique, or not actually memorizing the keys.

 

a. First (before the tests), we trusted to program to ‘assess’ their progress. We tried to monitor and catch kids as they used the wrong fingers, then we’d correct them in the moment. Once they started getting deep into the program, though, there were just too many balls in the air. More and more kids were slipping by with bad technique, and it was getting too cumbersome to manage.

b. Once we realized this wasn't working, we introduced the testing. We assigned a couple levels as 'test' levels. We chose the ones that were basically review. For example, 'Level 9' was a review of the 'home row' ("A" through ";" on the keyboard). Here's what it looks like:

 

  c. When a student takes a test, they need to do a couple things.      i. Cover their hands with a box.      ii. Remove the image of the keyboard/fingers from the screen (pictured below).   

 

c. When a student takes a test, they need to do a couple things.

     i. Cover their hands with a box.

     ii. Remove the image of the keyboard/fingers from the screen (pictured below). 

 

 

     iii. Get at least 95%, and type at a certain speed in order to pass (the speed varies depending on the level).

d. If they pass, they need to mark their progress on a chart. Here’s what that looks like.



 

The good parts about doing it this way:

 

  1. It’s simple. Very simple. There’s nothing to plan, you just need to be in the room and make sure students are working.

  2. The chart makes it easy to check a kid’s progress. At any time, I can pull a kid aside and have them do a level they said they passed.

  3. Students are 100% accountable for their own progress. We’ve got some kids that nail the practice and are pretty much done with the program, other kids that aren’t getting the practice they should be getting. If a kid isn’t getting it done, it shows.  

 

The ‘meh’:

 

  1. You can’t watch every kid the way you’d want. You’re still ‘managing,’and putting a lot of trust in them to do it right. If they’re doing it wrong and forming bad habits, though, you need to figure out a way to iron these out. But at least it doesn’t go unchecked for very long.


 

Sidenote:

I found this cool program called ‘Nitro Type.’ It’s a racing game. Kids type sentences. The faster they type, the faster they can get a car to move. It’s fun, they love it.

 

We let students that pass level 90 on TypingClub play Nitro Type. We’ve got a couple kids that are there, and everyone else gets jealous when they’re on Nitro Type. Kids beg to play it during breaks and at home, too.


 

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if you want to talk shop: andrew.jeong@matcheducation.org

Software Review: TypingClub

Guest Post by Andrew from Match Next

Software Review: TypingClub


Ever see someone pecking at a computer keyboard like this with their fingers?

No offense to our typing-challenged readers, but it’s tough to watch. I’ve gotten into debates before with others about whether kids need formal typing instruction, or whether they should just ‘figure it out.’ Some people say that everyone eventually figures out ‘what works best for them,’ and that we don’t need to push a particular style of typing. I’ll call this the ‘Tim Tebow Theory of Typing.’ In college, Tebow figured out a throwing motion that “worked best for him.” And it worked pretty well - well enough for two Heismans.Then he decided he wanted to play in the NFL. Ask Belichick how he felt about ‘Tebow’s way’ (and how many millions of dollars Tebow missed out on because he couldn’t fix his ridiculously long throwing motion).


So if you’re like us and want students typing with all ten fingers and using the home row, here’s a great program we’ve found. It’s called TypingClub.

 

The basics:

Typing Club is an online program that teaches students how to type using the correct fingers.

I’d rate it an 8 out of 10. I haven’t spent much time trying out other ones, so if you have one you like, it may very well be as good or better than what we’re using. If you’re looking for something to use, though, TypingClub is a great option.

 

How it works:

There are 100 ‘lessons,’ though you can add more or make your own if you want). Some are introductory levels, some are practice levels, and others are review levels. Here’s Level 1: Intro to “f” and “j” (the pink arrows added by me):

And here’s level 9, a review level of the home row:

Students type the letters that are shown above. Green highlighting means they hit the right key, red means the hit the wrong key. On the bottom right of the screen, they can see both their speed and accuracy. There’s also a picture of a hand and a keyboard. The highlighted key + fingertip shows which finger the user should use to type a key. Students can choose to turn this option off (or the teacher can just remove this option completely when setting up the level). More next time on how we’ve used this option.

I also set a few minimum requirements for students to “pass” a level. They need to get 95% of the keystrokes right and type at a speed no less than 15 words per minute (wpm) in order to pass a level. If they don’t hit these benchmarks, they have to do the level over again.

Those numbers have worked pretty well for us. I picked 95% sort of randomly randomly, and I picked 15 wpm because that’s about how fast our average student can handwrite.


The good: Simplicity. It’s simple to use, simple to navigate, simple to analyze kid data, simple to sign in.

Customizability. You can move levels around, delete student progress to have them redo certain activities, set minimum requirements for passing specific levels, or even rewrite entire levels if you feel like a particular one isn’t good enough.

 

The bad: It’s not really ‘fun.’ If you’re like me and grew up on Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing, you know the thrill of flinging insects from your windshield as your ‘car’ responds to your typing speed. TypingClub has no such games.

There’s another challenge that’s not really the program’s fault – it’s hard to enforce ‘correct’ finger usage and no-look typing (that is, typing without ogling your hands). We’ve had some trouble with this. We’ve tested a few ‘hacks’ for this puzzle, but more on this in a later blog. But warning: if you don’t solve this, all the data you get from the program is worth about as much as Tebow is to an NFL squad.

 

The data

There’s a dashboard with all sorts of nifty analytics about student’s progress through the program. You can pretty much see everything, like

  • the number of attempts students made on any level

  • students’ typing speed (wpm)

  • typing accuracy

  • # of attempts on each level, etc.


Here’s a picture of one of the data-dashboards:

Some interesting things here. But like I said, it doesn’t really mean anything if your students’ aren’t using ‘correct’ fingers, or don’t actually learn where the keys are.

 

Next time: I’ll describe all the ‘hacks’ we’ve tested to get students using the program correctly. Stay tuned.

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if you want to talk shop: andrew.jeong@matcheducation.org